Available Projects for Students

Student projects in LMIS1
We offer a variety of projects for students for both semester and master projects in the field of Micro- & Nanoengineering. Mostly, the proposed projects are linked to our ongoing research topics for PhD projects, postdocs or senior scientist, that are funded by EPFL or third party funds (SNF, CTI/KTI, EU, etc). In that way, the student is involved in real-life topics with clearly assigned tasks that are complementary but in collaboration with the laboratory’s research staff. Alternatively, we also invite Master students to propose their own idea on the realization of a new technology or device in the field of Micro- & Nanoengineering. If you have a concrete idea, please don’t hesitate to talk to Prof. J. Brugger and Dr. G. Boero directly or to one of the staff members to see if a Semester or Master project can be defined around the idea generated by you.
Download all the available projects here
All student projects are also listed on IS-academia

Thermal Scanning Probe Lithography

Thermal scanning probe lithography (t-SPL) is an emerging technique for rapid prototyping at the nanometer scale. In t-SPL, a heated atomic force microscopy tip is used to pattern a temperature sensitive resist. The fine control over the indentation depth of the tip via an electrostatic potential between the tip and the substrate allows fabrication of grey scale patterns at high precision.

Two-dimensional material nanoribbons fabricated by thermal scanning probe lithography

Type : Semester Project / Master Project

Section : Microengineering, Material Science, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Microelectronics

A key technical challenge for fabrication of atomic-thick nanostructure at the resolution of <50nm is the compatibility of the materials and fabrication process. For example, even low electron doses used in electron beam lithography can induce defects such as sulfur vacancies in graphene or monolayer MoS2. And resist residues affect significantly the performance of the devices. Plasma cleaning is widely used to remove the resist contaminations but as well introduce some vacancies in 2D materials.

Here we propose thermal scanning probe lithography (t-SPL) for high-resolution 2D and 3D subtractive/additive manufacturing, which avoids electron-induced damage, therefore it can readily be implemented to prototype and fabricate high-quality 2D nanostructures. The resolution is well defined by the diameter of the nanoprobe with 5-20nm. Additionally, a thermosensitive resist, PPA, is linked to the t-SPL pattern, directly sublimates and thus enables the localized depolymerization at sub-10 nm scale and at high speed.

We aim at fabricating narrow nanoribbons of 2D materials by t-SPL combined with dry etching. The main tasks of the project are experiments including t-SPL pattern, AFM, etc. The project can be adjusted to the student’s interest, eventually.

Figure 1. (a) t-SPL tool in our lab, (b) the t-SPL pattern process and (c) the fabrication process of nanoribbons and nanoribbon transistors [Nano Lett. 2019, 19, 2092−2098].

Work description:

  • Preparation of 2D flakes, such as MoS2 or graphene.
  • Spin coating of PPA, or other bilayer/trilayer.
  • t-SPL pattern.
  • Etching of 2D materials.
  • AFM measurement.

Contact: Xia Liu ([email protected])

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Accurate location and additive process of “hidden” atomically thin objects by thermal scanning probe lithography

Type : Master Project

Section : Microengineering, Material Science, Mechanical engineering, Physics, Microelectronics

Detection and manipulation of nanoscale structures buried under spin coated films are part of standard micro-/nanofabrication processes, in particular those involving lithography, such as pattern transfer, lift-off and local ion implantation. Moreover, precise location of the buried features would provide a direct means for addressing the critical challenge of overlay accuracy for device fabrication. Thermal scanning probe lithography (t-SPL) is capable of measuring nanometer-scale topography as well as subtractive/additive manufacturing with 2 nm vertical and 10 nm lateral resolution.


Here we propose thermal scanning probe lithography (t-SPL) for accurate location of two-dimensional (2D) materials and 1D nanomaterials, such as graphene, MoS2 or CNT, coated with resist films, and then additive process that is combined with lift-off. Model for the formation of film topography over buried thin features during spin coating will be investigated. Then the model will be validated in the experiments where features and spin-coated films are designed with different thicknesses. Next, the markerless overlay approach will be used to the fabrication of electrodes for 2D flakes.


We aim at imaging the thin 2D flakes buried by resist films and patterning electrodes on them with ultrahigh accuracy. The main tasks of the project are simulation and experiments including t-SPL pattern, AFM, evaporation, lift-off etc. The project can be adjusted to the student’s interest, eventually.

Figure 1. (a) t-SPL tool in our lab, (b) the t-SPL pattern process. (c) Diagram showing the surface of the resist (red lines) with different thickness.

Work description:
● Modelling and simulation.
● Preparation of 2D flakes, such as MoS2 or graphene.
● Spin coating of PPA, or other bilayer/trilayer.
● t-SPL pattern.
● Evaporation and liftoff.
● AFM measurement.

Contact: Xia Liu ([email protected])

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Grayscale Nanolithography

In addition to advancements in lithography for nanoscale patterning, 2.5D (grayscale) and 3D nanolithography have recently become an interest for optics, electronics, and nanofluidic applications. So far, laser and electron beam-based grayscale lithographies have been widely used for grayscale patterning. LMIS1 works on high-resolution grayscale nanostructuring by using thermal scanning probe lithography (T-SPL) with 2 nm vertical and 10 nm lateral resolution control.

Grayscale nanolithography and nanoimprint lithography

Type : Semester project / Master project

Section : Microengineering, Materials Science

We aim to fabricate high aspect ratio grayscale nanostructures with thermal scanning probe lithography (T-SPL). T-SPL is a non-conventional nanolithography technique to create 2.5D (grayscale) shapes with sub-2 nm vertical precision and 10 nm lateral resolution [1]. Grayscale nanostructures with depth up to 100 nm are patterned on thermosensitive resist, then there are transferred to substrates with vertical depth amplification. However, the repeatability and scalability of scanning probe-based fabrication at a reasonable cost for high-volume mass production are the main bottlenecks. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is the most widely used way to overcome these issues in the industry. We aim to fabricate thermal NIL stamp with resolution down to the single-digit nanometer by combining T-SPL and dry etch transfer techniques.

Figure 1 (a) Scheme of electrostatically actuated T-SPL patterning (b) TEM image of the scanning probe tip. (c) Scheme T-SPL patterning on thermosensitive resist PPA [2]. (d-g) High-aspect ratio T-SPL nanopatterns fabricated in silicon substrate [3]

The main tasks in the project will be:

  • T-SPL patterning and dry etch transfer from polymer to substrate
  • Nanoimprint lithography
  • Metrology characterization

Desired Skills:

  • Autonomy
  • Knowledge in cleanroom processes is a plus

References:

[1]  Howell, Samuel Tobias, et al. “Thermal scanning probe lithography—A review.” Microsystems & nanoengineering 6.1 (2020): 1-24.

[2]  Ryu Cho, Yu Kyoung, et al. “Sub-10 nanometer feature size in silicon using thermal scanning probe lithography.” ACS nano 11.12 (2017): 11890-11897.

[3]  Lisunova, Yuliya, et al. “High-aspect ratio nanopatterning via combined thermal scanning probe lithography and dry etching.” Microelectronic Engineering 180 (2017): 20-24.

Contact: Berke Erbas ([email protected])

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Nanostencil for Single Ion Doping

At LMIS1 we are also taking part on the research for new quantum technologies by using nanostencils (consisting into a very thin Si3N4 membrane with nanoapertures patterned into it) as masks for the precise placement of single ions into silicon in order to use their nuclear or electronic spins as quantum entities to be utilized as qubits for quantum computing. We are currently exploring different strategies such as ion implantation or ion diffusion to achieve single ion doping and improve the state-of-the-art.

Chemical surface modification via stencil lithography

Type : Semester/Master project

Section : Microengineering, Physics, Materials Science

Stencil lithography is a high-resolution patterning technique based on the shadow mask principle which has been used since the ancient ages. In the last decades, this technique has evolved for the patterning of micro and nanostructures mainly for thin-film deposition, but also for etching and ion implantation. Using stencil for micro and nanopatterning offers some advantages compared to conventional lithographic techniques such as being an easily repositionable and reusable mask and the fact that allows to by-pass many steps of conventional lithographic techniques. Considering all these advantages, stencil may be a good candidate to explore to be used as a mask for the selective chemical modification of surfaces

The main objective of this project is to use stencils as masks for the selective chemical modification of the surface of a substrate so that then molecules binding specifically only to the chemically modified regions can be placed in the predefined pattern.

The initial idea is to study the effect of using stencils on an HF-pretreated silicon surface for an oxygen plasma treatment, but the student is welcome to bring new ideas for different chemical surface modification strategies.

Figure 1. Main idea and scheme of the process: (1)Si surface treated with HF, (2) Stencil is placed over the surface to be modified, (3) Oxygen plasma is performed to chemically modify the surface, (4) Stencil is removed

Work description:

  • Review state of the art of selective chemical surface modification and characterization.
  • Design and fabrication of micro and /or nanostencils at CMi cleanroom
  • Application of chemical modification strategies such as oxygen plasma using the stencil as a mask.
  • Characterization of the chemically modified surface.

Contact: Pol Torres Vila ([email protected])

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Additive Manufacturing for Therapeutic Delivery Devices

In LMIS1 we are currently developing therapeutic delivery devices that encapsulate various therapeutic cargos using additive manufacturing technology. The high degree of freedom in design and materials in additive manufacturing technology (AM) enables device adaptation for personalized therapeutic. Further incorporation of biodegradable materials and active release methods into our device will expand the technique’s applicability.

Fabrication of lipid microstructure for oral drug delivery device

Type : Master/Semester project

Section : Microengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Bio engineering, Materials Science

Co-administration of poorly water-soluble drugs with lipid formulations can enhance the bioavailability of these drugs. Administration of drugs encapsulated lipid formulations can be the one way of achieving this. Recently fabricating the various design of drug-lipid formulations enabled by the development of additive manufacturing techniques. However, most of the device’s dimension is limited to mm to cm. Thus, limiting the versatility of the device’s pharmacokinetics. Melt electro writing is an attractive tool for decreasing the device’s resolution to the micrometer size. The goal of this project is to fabricate lipid drug delivery devices using melt electro writing. Throughout this project, you will prepare and optimize the melt electro writing condition of lipid drug formulation. Then you will investigate the effect of the design, dimension, drug types, lipid types on the device’s drug release. Hence the first half of the project will focus on preparing various lipid-drug formations and optimizing their printing condition. And the last half will be focused on printing devices with different designs, and measuring and analyzing their drug release profile.

Figure 1. From right to left:  Melt electro writing tool setup, Lipid Taylor corn, Lipid chess board structure                                                    

Work description :

  • Preparation of lipid-drug formulation
  • Optimizing the melt electro writing condition of lipid-drug formulation
  • Fabricating various designs, dimensions of the lipid-drug device
  • Measuring and analyzing the drug release profile of the device in digestive system mimicking environment.

Contact : Jongeon Park ([email protected])

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Acoustically mediated drug delivery device with frequency selectivity

Type : Master/Semester project

Section : Microengineering, Mechanical Engineering

Actively controlled release function is important for implantable drug delivery device. Because we can achieve sophisticated and personalized treatment according to the patient’s feedback after the implantation. Acoustic field is suitable for external stimulus for active controlled release due to its body penetration ability, biocompatibility, and low manipulation power. When acoustic field exposed to the drug solution encapsulated device, acoustic pressure cause by standing waves give stress to the sealing layer. Acoustic harmonic frequency of the device which gives maximum vibration can be tuned by changing the design of the capsule. By using this phenomenon, we can selectively open the sealing layer of the device with different shape. (Figure 1) This project will mainly compose of the two-part simulation and design part and test part. For the simulation and design part, you will design and optimize the device structure according to the simulation results of its vibration force distribution to device in a fluid environment under acoustic wave exposure. For the test part, you will set up the platform for acoustically mediated drug release experiment. The simulation will be 6-7 weeks and fabrication of the prototype and acoustic release test will take 7 weeks.

Figure 1. Right to left:  Concept of the project, Initial simulation results: Stress applied on sealing layer according to the frequency.

Work description:

  • COMSOL simulation to figure out each design’s harmonic frequency which give maximum stress to the sealing layer
  • Setting up the platform for acoustically mediated drug release experiment.
  • Acoustically mediated drug release experiment

 Contact : Jongeon Park ([email protected])

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Additive Manufacturing for Biomedical Applications

At LMIS1, we are expanding our capabilities in micro manufacturing of biomaterials using 3D printing. Melt electrowriting (MEW) is an electrohydrodynamic 3D printing technique which involves processing of polymer melts into micron sized fibers (5-100 microns) using high voltage as the driving force. The fibers can be deposited in a layer-by-layer manner to make 3D printed constructs. The 3D printing can be done in desired patterns to produce a wide range of mechanical properties.

3D Printing of Biomaterial Scaffolds with Tailorable Properties

Type: Master/Semester project

Section: Microengineering, Bio Engineering, Materials Science

Melt electrowriting is a quickly advancing additive manufacturing technique which utilizes a large electrical voltage to stretch a polymer melt extruded through the nozzle into fibers down to micron range and precisely deposit them into desired patterns. The obtained product is often termed as a scaffold in literature. These scaffolds are flexible, light and easy to handle. The properties of the produced structures are tailorable by altering the deposition pattern, fiber diameter and the material used for printing.

A large variety of polymers have been processed using this technique with poly caprolactone (PCL) being the most utilized due to ease in processability and very limited degradation of the polymer at its melting temperature. PCL has been processed into a large variety of designs or patterns (Figure 1A). Depending on the chosen design, the scaffolds have different mechanical properties and induce a different biological response.

At LMIS1, we have 4 MEW printers which are capable of printing polymers with a melting temperature range from 30-250 °C. Our current projects involve printing of PCL and shape memory polymers. The goal is to identify novel MEW processable materials and expand the library of materials for this 3D printing technology. Such an approach ensures accessibility to a variety of properties linked to the corresponding material. Successful production of scaffolds using different materials will contribute towards other biomedical material related projects of the lab. The filament materials used in this project will be commercially sourced.

his student project will contribute towards establishing 3D printing protocol for the obtained filaments. The project will involve parametric optimization of MEW of the polymers. The parameters which will be explored are voltage, flow rate, printing temperature, printing speed and design amongst other parameters. The polymers which will be explored in this project will have biocompatible/biodegradable properties. The project will involves various aspects such as learning the working of a 3D printer, material characterization techniques, imaging techniques and learning MEW to obtain scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

Figure 1 : (a) sample scaffold designs printed using MEW of poly caprolactone (scale bar: top-500 microns, bottom-100 microns); (b) schematic of MEW device [1-2]

Possible tasks:

  • Characterization of materials chosen before and after printing.
  • Parametric optimization of melt electrowriting of materials.
  • Characterization of the resulting scaffolds using imaging (SEM, microscopy), mechanical testing and other techniques.
  • Exploring the possible biomedical applications for designed material.

References:

[1]  Robinson et al (2019) Advanced Functional Materials, volume 29, Issue 44.

[2]  Hochleitner et al (2016) BioNanoMaterials, volume 17, Issue 3-4

Contact: Biranche Tandon ([email protected])

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Cryogenic Microwave Thermometry

At LMIS1 we are currently assessing possible alternatives to state-of-the-art 4-wires thermistors for cryogenic thermometry in ultra-low temperature systems (i.e. < 90 K). High quality factor superconducting resonators are investigated in order to explore the fundamental T-variations properties related to Cooper pairs kinetic inductance changes, with the final goal to sense cryogenic temperatures by means of resonance frequency shifts.

Development of Temperature-Sensitive High Kinetic Inductance Thin-Films Superconducting Resonators

Type : Master/Semester project

Section : Microengineering, Physics, Electric Engineering, Materials Science

The operation of large cryogenic apparatus often relies on distributed temperature measurements. The well-established electric thermometers (4-wire approach) presents a series of inconveniences: feedthrough space requirement, risk of leaks, risk of electric breakdown, heat input (conduction in wires), need for thermalization, etc… Allocating large number of thermometers or compensating for the absence of distributed thermometry imposes important constraints in the design of the apparatus.

At the LMIS1, we are currently investigating new possibilities of providing a temperature measurement system in cryogenic environment (T<10 K) by means of RF lumped elements resonators, electromagnetically coupled to standard coplanar waveguides PCBs (Figure a-b). Such a goal would be achieved by exploiting the superconductor’s kinetic inductance and London penetration depth temperature dependencies inducing a frequency response of the resonator to temperature (Figure c).

This student project will contribute to enhance the temperature sensitivity of such resonators, either by exploiting new materials (e.g. Nb(Ti)N for low and YBCO for high temperature ranges), by investigating thin film nano-structuration and localized film oxidation, or by suggesting innovative RF designs, which will be then fully tested and characterized in cryogenic (T<10 K) environments using liquid He and cryostat apparatuses. The topic is highly multidisciplinary, involving aspects of condensed matter physics, RF electronics design and test, cleanroom microfabrication and materials science: the focus can be adjusted depending on the student’s preferential interests, best knowledge, previous experience and motivation.

Figure 1 : (a) schematic showing the superconducting resonator chip coupled to a standard Cu PCB; (b) COMSOL simulation of an S-shaped split ring resonator, showing the correct orientation of the B-field for CPW coupling; (c) principle of temperature sensing by kinetic inductance-induced resonance frequency shift [1-2]

Possible tasks :

  • Simulate and analyze superconducting RF components and resonators.
  • Design, optimize and/or execute process flows at EPFL’s state-of-the-art CMi cleanroom:
    • Process flow conception,
    • Drawing individual devices and aggregated chip/wafer lithography layouts,
    • Characterization of the resulting components using SEM, AFM, and other metrology tools.
  • Cryo-RF characterization of finalized devices in a cutting-edge experimental setup.

References :

[1] P.K. Day et al. (2003) Nature 425 817.

[2] H. Yu et al (2022) SN Applied Sciences 4:67.

Contact: André Chatel ([email protected])

Hernan Furci ([email protected])

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Microfabrication of High-Sensitivity Kinetic Inductance S-shaped Split Ring Superconducting Resonators

Type: Semester project

Section: Microengineering, Electrical Engineering, Physics

The operation of large cryogenic apparatuses often relies on distributed temperature measurements. The well-established electric thermometers (4-wire approach) present a series of inconveniences: feedthrough space requirement, risk of leaks, risk of electric breakdown, heat input (conduction in wires), need for thermalization, etc… Allocating large number of thermometers or compensating for the absence of distributed thermometry imposes important constraints in the design of the apparatus.

At the LMIS1, we are currently investigating new possibilities of providing a temperature measurement system in cryogenic environments (T < 10 K) by means of RF lumped elements resonators, namely S-shaped Split Ring Resonators (Figure 1). Such a goal would be achieved by exploiting the high kinetic inductance of thin-films made up of low temperature superconducting materials (i.e. Al, Nb, NbN, NbTi, NbTiN, etc…) [1-2].

This student project will contribute to enhance the temperature sensitivity of such devices by patterning ultra-thin (t < 100 nm) Nb-based superconducting films: the realization of such S-SR resonators will involve all standard microfabrication processing steps, ranging from film deposition, to micro-patterning, etching and electron microscope imaging.

The specificities of this project and the limited amount of time available require us to consider preferentially students with previous experience in microfabrication at the CMi cleanrooms; a good autonomous attitude, as well as self-organization skills and scheduling flexibility, are paramount requirements to carry out the proposed project.

Figure 1 : (left) optical microscope picture of an S-SRR, showing an asymmetric EM resonance mode under the excitation of a coplanar waveguide; (center) SEM zoom of the center of the S-SRR, with a highlight on the microstructures interdigitated finger capacitance; (right) principle of temperature sensing by kinetic inductance-induced resonance frequency shift [1]

Project tasks:

  • Carry out fabrication of ultra-thin Nb-based films superconducting resonators
    • Thin film deposition
    • Micropatterning by means of direct laser photolithography and etching techniques
    • Characterization of the devices (i.e. mechanical profiler, probing station, SEM, AFM, etc…)

References:

[1]  P.K. Day et al. (2003) Nature 425 817.

[2]  H. Yu et al (2022) SN Applied Sciences 4:67.

Contact: André Chatel ([email protected])

Hernan Furci ([email protected])

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ESR and NMR Spectroscopy

Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a widely used technique for the recognition of chemical radicals and species. At LMIS1 we are currently working on the optimization of ESR sensors’ sensitivity, especially for samples in the nanoliter and sub-nanoliter range, through the use of superconducting resonating structures.

Analog/RF Integrated Circuit Design for Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy

Type : Master/Semester project

Section : Microengineering, Physics, Electric Engineering, Materials Science

Electron spin resonance (ESR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are powerful and widely applied spectroscopic tools used in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. Due to the broad range of potential applications, it is important to improve the conventional inductive techniques and develop new detection methods for high sensitivity ESR and NMR spectroscopy in the sub-nanoliter range.

We design RF integrated transmitter and receiver blocks to perform ESR and NMR experiments. This work requires application specific design techniques. Previously, we have presented the first single-chip DNP microsystem which consists of an ESR detector and an NMR transceiver [1]. The CMOS chip photo is shown in Fig. 1. We have also designed an ultra-low power ESR detector in HEMT technology [2], which is also shown in Fig. 1.

Figure 1. (a) The first single-chip DNP microsystem and (b) an ultra-low power ESR detector.

Work description :

  • Design of analog and RF building blocks for broadband transceivers from MHz range to several GHz
  • Design of passive RF components that will be a part of RF blocks
  • Simulation with Cadence Virtuoso and Keysight ADS for analog and RF simulations
  • Layout design and post-layout simulations
  • Designed blocks will be taped out in future ESR and NMR chips
  • Project can be adjusted to the student’s interests

References :

[1] Sahin Solmaz, Nergiz, et al. “Single-chip dynamic nuclear polarization microsystem.” Analytical Chemistry 92.14 (2020): 9782-9789.

[2] Sahin-Solmaz, Nergiz, Alessandro V. Matheoud, and Giovanni Boero. “A Low Power 35 GHz HEMT Oscillator for Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy.” 2021 IEEE Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits Symposium (RFIC). IEEE, 2021.

Contact: Nergiz Sahin Solmaz ([email protected])

Reza Farsi ([email protected])

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Design, realization and testing of a cryogenic probe for sensors characterization

Type : Semester project / Master project

Section : Microengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Microelectronics

The low temperature characterization is of paramount importance in some fields and for some sensors. A proper characterization requires an optimized probe system used to expose the sample to a low temperature environment, allowing at the same time to retrieve in real time the information of interest from the sensor under test. This project aims at designing and testing a low temperature probing system, both for RF and DC signals, to be used with dewars of liquid nitrogen (LN2, 77K) and dewars of liquid helium (LHe, 4K), starting from the requirements forced by the environment and by the sensors to be characterized.

Work description :

  • Requirements analysis
  • Design of the probe, mechanical end electronics parts (DC and RF)
  • Realization of the probe
  • Testing of the probe in LN2 / LHe by characterization of one of the sensors it was designed for.

Contact: Roberto Russo ([email protected])

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Superconducting RF Resonators for Electron Spin Resonance

Type : Master Project

Section : Microengineering, Physics, Electric Engineering, Materials Science

Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) is a well-established characterization technique. In order to excite the spin ensembles a microwave signal needs to be provided. The sensitivity of this method is depending on many parameters. Among those parameters, one of the most important is the resonator quality factor, which, if increased, could boost the sensor’s sensitivity. Resonators realized with superconducting materials allow to achieve higher quality factors with respect to those made of ordinary metals. Many examples of those resonators already exist in literature, realized with materials such as Nb [1-2] and Al [3].

At LMIS1, provided the application related constrains, we are currently investigating different designs and different superconducting materials to realize superconducting resonators, mainly low temperature superconductors (LTS) such as NbTi and NbTiN.

This student project will focus on developing and optimizing a fabrication process for YBCO, a high temperature superconductor (HTS). The process flow will be used to fabricate high quality factor superconducting resonators by optimizing the fabrication parameters, with the main goal of realizing a material independent and high patterning accuracy microfabrication process. The resulting resonators will be characterized in cryogenic environments (T~77 K) using liquid N2. The topic is highly multidisciplinary, involving aspects of condensed matter physics, RF electronics design and test, cleanroom microfabrication and materials science: the focus can be adjusted depending on the student’s interests, best knowledge, previous experience and motivation.

Figure 1 : Thin film, superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators. Top Left: pattern example of a thin Nb film resonator [1]. Top Right: transmission frequency behavior of a Nb resonator [2]. Bottom Left: resonance frequency detail of an Al resonator [3]. Bottom Right: SEM image of first fabrication attempt on YBCO film.

Possible tasks :

  • Optimize superconducting RF resonators design to increase resonator quality factor.
  • Design, optimize and execute process flows at EPFL’s state-of-the-art CMi cleanroom:
    • Process flow conception,
    • Drawing individual devices and aggregated chip/wafer lithography layouts,
    • Characterization of the resulting components using SEM, AFM, and other metrology tools,
    • Process flow optimization for pushing resolution and resonators’ quality factor.
  • Cryo-RF characterization of finalized devices in a cutting-edge experimental setup.

References :

[1] Eichler et al. (2017) PRL 118, 037701.
[2] Sigillito et al. (2017) Nature Nanotechnology 12, 958-962.
[3] Bienfait et al. (2015) ) Nature Nanotechnology 11, 253-257.

Contact: Roberto Russo ([email protected])

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Reconfigurable Photonic Integrated Circuits

Photonic equivalent of FPGA, Reconfigurable PICs can be implemented by using different physical mechanisms at nanoscale. We focus on the integration of Phase Change Materials on the standard silicon photonics platform to provide non-volatile components and on-chip photonic functions and systems.

No particular project is currently available for this research topic at the moment: nevertheless, LMIS1 encourages students to present their own ideas for such projects. Please, feel free to contact us for discussing about spontaneous applications around your innovative ideas.

Contact: Hernan Furci ([email protected])