Group for Fibre Optics (GFO)

The core research of our Group is oriented towards advanced applications of optical fibres that range from optical signal processing to sophisticated sensing techniques.

General Information

© 2020 EPFL / Alain Herzog

Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy

— EPFL scientists have developed a new type of microscope slide that can boost the amount of light in fluorescence microscopy by a factor of up to 25. These new slides can both amplify and direct light, making them ideal for applications ranging from early-stage diagnosis to the rapid archiving of pathology samples.

© 2020 EPFL / Alain Herzog

Glass slides that stand to revolutionize fluorescence microscopy

— EPFL scientists have developed a new type of microscope slide that can boost the amount of light in fluorescence microscopy by a factor of up to 25. These new slides can both amplify and direct light, making them ideal for applications ranging from early-stage diagnosis to the rapid archiving of pathology samples.

EPFL Racing Team's students spent a day demonstrating their technical expertise to qualify. ©Alain Herzog/EPFL

A summer of speed for EPFL Racing

— EPFL and its electric single-seater racing car will take part in Formula Student motor racing competitions in Switzerland, Czech Republic, Hungary and Germany this summer.

© 2020 EPFL

Unique new antiviral treatment made using sugar

— New antiviral materials made from sugar have been developed by researchers from the University of Manchester, the University of Geneva and the EPFL in Lausanne. They can destroy viruses on contact and may help in the fight against viral outbreaks. Although at an early stage of development, the broad-spectrum activity of this compound could also be effective against new emerging viruses such as the recent coronavirus currently of concern in China.

Proteins are the building blocks of life and play a key role in all biological processes. © Laura Persat / 2019 EPFL

Predicting a protein's behavior from its appearance

— Researchers at EPFL have developed a new way to predict a protein’s interactions with other proteins and biomolecules, and its biochemical activity, merely by observing its surface. The method, published in open-source format, opens up new possibilities for artificial protein design.

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